Transformed Livelihood Project III – Ikare, Ondo State

Project Period: July 2020 to June 2021 The training and distribution of birds and feed to participants held on the 31st October to 3rd November, 2020 The Transformed Livelihood Project (TLP3) is a 3 in 1 project that is aimed at empowering 40 youths to build and sustain livelihoods that will enable them to earn income, support their families and to become employers of labour hence reducing the number of unemployed youths in Nigeria. TLP3 is primarily focused on these 3 activities: Poultry training and distribution Entrepreneurship/Capacity building training and WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) training Through these activities, FLEP is aiming to contribute to the general and holistic transformation of the youths we are engaging in Ikare-Akoko. As part of the initiative, is to not only train participants in poultry farm enterprise but to distribute 30-day old chicks and 8 bags of feed to each selected participant, to enable Read More

Agriculture as a business: Approaching agriculture as an investment opportunity

AKINWUMI ADESINA ON 19 FEBRUARY 2016 African smallholders are the private sector – the largest segment on the continent. By seeing agriculture as business, smallholders as customers and entrepreneurs, and companies as organisations that want smallholders as customers and suppliers, policymakers and investors can leverage the continent’s existing assets to catalyse economic transformation rather than trying to create it from whole cloth. I was recently appointed president of the African Development Bank. A development bank is not necessarily an intuitive concept; most banks don’t exist to serve explicitly social purposes. But what defines a bank is the way it conducts business, whatever that business may be. This is why I say I wear my banker hat, and not my development hat when I speak about agriculture. Agriculture is not a way of life. It is not a social sector or a development activity, despite what people may claim. Agriculture is a Read More

Empowering Youths in Poultry Farming

The Livestock Empowerment Model (LEM) is an initiative of Full Life Empowerment Programme (FLEP), in partnership with Children’s Mission Africa, Children’s Mission Sweden, and The Navigators Nigeria. The program which started since July 2019 has empowered over 40 youths in Akure and its environs with skills in Poultry Farming. The participants of the LEM project successfully undertook capacity building training in poultry farming, with a view to improving their socio-economic status, get a sustainable livelihood and as well as contribute their quota to the agricultural development and food production in their communities. The empowerment program had a poultry storeroom, stocked with more than a 100 day-old chicks, bags of poultry feed and other materials needed to raise the birds ready to be distributed to participants. Each participant received 50 birds and bags of feeds as a startup for their poultry farm. One of the participants, Rashidat Alimi who is an Read More

Abia: Poultry Farming Empowering Youths in the Rural Community

At FLEP we empower youth entrepreneurship through quality poultry farming. Our approach is a fundamental tool for attaining sustainable economic development. More than ever, we need to enable our youth to live a purpose-driven life so they can build the world they want to see. It is important that today’s youth discover their purpose, transform their mindset and connect to their future. About 15 beneficiaries have been impacted so far, through the Transforming Livelihood Project, a joint effort of FLEP, Children’s Mission – CM and Young Farmer’s Club – YFC in Umourie community of Abia State. They have been able to create a poultry farming business where youth are employed and help themselves develop talents, and channel their energy into a course that will be of value to them, their immediate environment and the society. Through profits generated some of them have been able to continue their education after secondary Read More

Assurance of A Good Farm Produce

Many mothers in Benue communities are known to work and provide for the family, the work can be dangerous as a result of insecurities encountered on their way to farms and even on the farm – these women barely make enough to feed their family. Katherine is a mother of three children who lives in Adatsav village in Benue state – a predominantly agrarian community, the majority of the people concentrate on farming crops such as; cassava, yams, sesame seed, maize, and groundnuts. Katherine, on the other hand, combines both farming and fish selling. In 2018, Katherine and more than 100 women in some selected communities in Benue state were empowered with beehives farming initiatives through FLEP’s Honey Project, a resilient livelihood enterprise that fits in well with small scale farmers – beehives farming contributes to the livelihood security of Katherine and other women. At the beginning of the project, Read More

Oil Of Joy In Place Of Mourning

If you had met her some months back, she would have thought herself as walking in the shoes of Naomi (Ruth 1:13-21). But God turned her story around through a small thoughtful gesture by FLEP Rifikatu Yakubu, not only lost her husband, she also lost two sons; victims of the insurgency in parts of northern Nigeria. These calamities left Riftkatu with the burden of three surviving children, two daughters-in-law, and seven; all these for someone without any reliable means of livelihood! Rifikatu hails from Tafawa Balewa in Bauchi state. She is among the widows selected for the FLEP Transforming Livelihood Project Goat Intervention. Three (3) goats were given to her to rear and generate income with which to sustain herself and her family. Today, those three goats have multiplied to 10! Thanks to God’s mercies and Rifikatu’s hard work.  She is happy that her goats are increasing in number and Read More

Significant Role Of Rural Women In Agriculture

Over the years in Nigeria rural women have established defined roles in agriculture; they are involved in agricultural production, process and utilization. They are affected by social-economic factors that hinder the advancement of agriculture and poverty alleviation; these factors include education, access to social infrastructures, and daily income.  Lack of specific policies that do not support and protect the rural women give rise to high levels of poverty, illiteracy and non-involvement in the design and planning of programs and policies, therefore policies and services designed to women in the value chains should be developed. Despite the important roles they play in agricultural economies, rural women are the most visible to face poverty even when livelihoods and self-sustenance in rural areas are guaranteed as a result of their great efforts in agricultural production. However, they have to cover other needs, such as health care, paying for the education of their children Read More